Last edited by Mazulkis
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

9 edition of Origin and evolution of telomeres found in the catalog.

Origin and evolution of telomeres

  • 120 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by Landes Bioscience in Austin, Tex .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Telomere,
  • Telomere -- physiology,
  • Evolution, Molecular,
  • Telomerase -- genetics,
  • Telomerase -- physiology,
  • Telomere -- genetics

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statement[edited by] Jozef Nosek, Lubomír Tomáska.
    ContributionsNosek, Jozef, Ph.D., Tomáska, Lubomír.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQH600.3 .O75 2008
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19520202M
    ISBN 109781587063091
    LC Control Number2008010153

      This paper examines telomeres from an evolutionary perspective. In the monocot plant order Asparagales two evolutionary switch-points in telomere sequence are known. The first occurred when the Arabidopsis-type telomere was replaced by a telomere based on a repeat motif more typical of vertebrates. The replacement is associated with telomerase activity, but the telomerase has low .   Telomere Replication. The ends of the linear chromosomes are known as telomeres: repetitive sequences that code for no particular gene. These telomeres protect the important genes from being deleted as cells divide and as DNA strands shorten during replication. In humans, a six base pair sequence, TTAGGG, is repeated to times.

    About this book. This book is a comprehensive and up-to-date review and evaluation of the contemporary status of telomerase research. Chapters in this volume cover the basic structure, mechanisms, and diversity of the essential and regulatory subunits of telomerase. Since a conserved binding specificity has been shown in several homologues of both single‑stranded and double‑stranded telomere‑binding proteins, their binding may be considered a major selective force operating on telomeric DNA sequences.}, author = {Cohn, Marita}, booktitle = {Origin and evolution of telomeres}, editor = {Nosek, Jozef.

    Human evolution, the process by which human beings developed on Earth from now-extinct zoologically, we humans are Homo sapiens, a culture-bearing upright-walking species that lives on the ground and very likely first evolved in Africa about , years ago. We are now the only living members of what many zoologists refer to as the human tribe, Hominini, but there is .   In the human genome, over 98% of DNA is classified as noncoding DNA and can be transcribed to regulatory noncoding RNAs (i.e. tRNAs, rRNAs), origins of DNA replication, centromeres, telomeres and scaffold attachment regions (SARs).


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Origin and evolution of telomeres Download PDF EPUB FB2

: Origin and Evolution of Telomeres (Molecular Biology Intelligence Unit) (): Nosek, Jozef: BooksCited by: ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: pages: illustrations ; 24 cm.

Contents: Telomerase: evolution, structure, and function / Marie-Eve Brault, Yasmin D'Souza, and Chantal Autexier --Drosophila telomeres: a variation on the telomerase theme / Mary-Lou Pardue and P.

Gregory DeBaryshe --Alternative lengthening of telomeres in mammalian cells / Anthony J. Linear chromosomes represent an evolutionary innovation associated with the origin of eukaryotic cells.

This book describes how linear chromosomes and primordial pathways for maintaining their terminal structures, telomeres, emerged in early res, derived from the Greek meaning terminal part, were first described by Hermann Muller iCited by:   International contributors to a dozen chapters examine telomeres' properties, replication strategies, and roles--perhaps as "double agents"--in the evolution of the genome from prokaryotic cells (those without nuclei), and tumor expression/suppression.

([c] Book News, Inc., Portland, OR). Get this from a library. Origin and evolution of telomeres. [Jozef Nosek; Lubomír Tomáska;] -- Linear chromosomes represent an evolutionary innovation associated with the origin of eukaryotic cells.

This book describes how linear chromosomes and primordial pathways for maintaining their. Telomeres in evolution Origin and evolution of telomeres book evolution of telomeres Article (PDF Available) in Chromosome Research 13(5) February with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

The study of the evolution of the end of chromosomes, or telomeres, has moved from the abstract to molecular observations and mechanistic possibilities involved in evolution. Although successful end-replication and end-protection are the primary driving forces acting at all telomeres ((De Lange, )), the studies presented in this issue reveal apparent similarities, surprising differences.

It soon became apparent that this motif was conserved throughout evolution and that a common mechanism might exist in eukaryotes for the maintenance of telomeres. Inworking in Blackburn's laboratory, I identified an enzyme, telomerase, that added telomere repeats onto chromosome ends.

A History of Telomere Biology 2. The Telomerase Ribonucleoprotein Particle 3. Telomerase Biochemistry and Biogenesis 4. Telomerase and Human Cancer 5.

Modeling Cancer and Aging in the Telomerase–deficient Mouse 6. Telomerase Deficiency and Human Disease 7. Telomerase–independent Maintenance of Mammalian Telomeres 8.

Origin of human chromosome 2: An ancestral telomere–telomere fusion. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 88 (20): Chaves, R. et al. Molecular cytogenetic analysis and centromeric satellite organization of a novel 8;11 translocation in sheep: a possible intermediate in biarmed chromosome evolution.

The genomic tag hypothesis suggests that telomere addition can be viewed, from an evolutionary perspective, as abortive replication. Furthermore, if ancient tRNA-like structures were the predecessors of the built-in template in contemporary telomerases, it would explain why modern telomere sequences are variations on a C n A m repeat motif.

The emergence of a second transmissible tumour in the Tasmanian devil population, devil facial tumour 2 (DFT2), has prompted questions on the origin and evolution of these transmissible tumours. We used a combination of cytogenetic mapping and telomere length measurements to predict the evolutionary trajectory of chromosome rearrangements in DFT2.

The New York Times bestselling book coauthored by the Nobel Prize winner who discovered telomerase and telomeres' role in the aging process and the health psychologist who has done original research into how specific lifestyle and psychological habits can protect telomeres, slowing disease and improving life.

Have you wondered why some sixty-year-olds look and feel like for/5(). J.C. DeWitt, R.W. Luebke, in Comprehensive Toxicology, Replicative Senescence/Telomere Shortening. Replicative senescence is the natural barrier to unlimited proliferation that is characteristic of all human somatic cells, and it is thought to be regulated by telomere shortening (Effros ).Telomeres, or the ‘ends’ of chromosomes that are involved in chromosomal.

Humans and great apes differ in chromosome numbers—humans have 46 while apes have The difference is claimed to be due to the “end-to-end fusion” of two small, ape-like chromosomes in a human-ape ancestor that joined in the distant past and formed human chromosome 2.

This idea was first proposed by researchers who noticed that humans and chimps share similar chromosomal staining. Structure. Telomeres are specialized protein–DNA constructs present at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, which prevent them from degradation and end-to-end chromosomal fusion.

Introductory biology courses often describe telomeres as a type of chromosomal vertebrate telomeric DNA consists of long (T T A G G G)n repeats of variable length, often around kb. A telomere (/ ˈ t ɛ l ə m ɪ ə r / or / ˈ t i l ə m ɪ ə r /) is a region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome, which protects the end of the chromosome from deterioration or from fusion with neighboring name is derived from the Greek nouns telos (τέλος) "end" and merοs (μέρος, root: μερ-) "part".For vertebrates, the sequence of.

Analysis of telomeres, the nucleoprotein complexes that physically cap and protect the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, has a long and intriguing history. The recent resurgence of plant telomere biology prompted us to recap this history to provide background and context for current investigations.

A ground breaking book on the history of Telomeres offering fresh advice on how to slow down aging and lengthen life. Nobel prize winning Doctor Elizabeth Blackburn and leading health psychologist Dr Elissa Epel have discovered biological markers called Telomeres which can help to understand how healthy our cells are and what we can do to.

INTRODUCTION. Chromosome evolution in eukaryotes has been largely shaped by rearrangements and localized chromosome instabilities that may have played a role in the emergence of lineage-specific characteristics (1,2).Because of their function, it is likely that telomeres have had a major influence on the way karyotypes have evolved.

Personally I don’t think it is so, for example after reading the book by Chin, Elaine, MD: “Lifelines. Unlock the Secrets of Your Telomeres for a Longer, Healthier Life”, in which we read about animals, like a whale found to be years old when caught, and its telomeres not getting shorter, or a bird with its telomeres increasing in s: 3.Telomere, segment of DNA occurring at the ends of chromosomes in eukaryotic cells (cells containing a clearly defined nucleus).Telomeres are made up of repeated segments of DNA that consist of the sequence 5′-TTAGGG-3′ (in which T, A, and G are the bases thymine, adenine, and guanine, respectively).Some human cells contain as many as 1, to 2, repeats of this sequence at each .Telomeres are the non-coding portions of DNA sequences at the end of each linear chromosome.

Mammalian telomeres consist of nucleotides with repeated sequences of TTAAGGG.