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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of Dendritic cells of human skin found in the catalog.

Dendritic cells of human skin

G. Niebauer

Dendritic cells of human skin

dendritic cells in epidermis and their related cellsin dermis. Cytology, physiology and pathology, with particular reference to melanin.

by G. Niebauer

  • 118 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Karger in Basel, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Skin.,
  • Melanins.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesExperimental biology and medicine -- v. 2
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 144 p. :
    Number of Pages144
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19953276M

      This is the most comprehensive handbook on dendritic cells, featuring an introduction by Ralph M. Steinman and written by top experts. In three volumes, it covers all aspects from molecular cell biology to clinical applications, highlighting the role of dendritic cells in fighting cancer, virus infections, and autoimmune diseases. The effective vaccines developed against a variety of infectious agents, including polio, measles, and hepatitis B, represent major achievements in medicine. These vaccines, usually composed of microbial antigens, are often associated with an adjuvant that activates dendritic cells (DCs). Many infectious diseases are still in need of an effective vaccine including HIV, malaria, Cited by:

    Langerhans cells (LC) are tissue-resident dendritic cells of the skin, and contain organelles called Birbeck are present in all layers of the epidermis and are most prominent in the stratum spinosum. They also occur in the papillary dermis, particularly around blood vessels, as well as in the mucosa of the mouth, foreskin, and vaginal on: Dendritic cell. dendritic cell: cell of neural crest origin with extensive processes; they develop melanin m(s): Langerhans cells.

    Immunity—Langerhans cells in the skin are dendritic cells that take up microbial antigens in the skin to transform into anti-gen presenting cells and provide immunity by interacting with T cells. The name Lang-erhans comes from the German physician and anatomist that discovered these cells in the skin when he was a medical Size: 2MB.   Browse the archive of articles on Nature. From Galileo to Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, catch up on some of the science classics you’ve always intended to Cited by:


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Dendritic cells of human skin by G. Niebauer Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Niebauer, G. Dendritic cells of human skin. Basel, Switzerland, New York, S. Karger, (OCoLC) 2. Skin dendritic cells. The demonstration of MHC Class II, Fc and C3 receptors on epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) years after their initial discovery by Paul Langerhans inconfirmed their identity as immune cells and promoted the use of human skin as a convenient source to study tissue DCs.These initial studies on murine and human LCs formed the Cited by: Dendritic cells (DCs), named for their probing, ‘tree-like’ or dendritic shapes, are responsible for the initiation of adaptive immune responses and hence function as the ‘sentinels’ of the immune system.

Paul Langerhans first described DCs in human skin in but thought they were cutaneous nerve cells. DCs are bone marrow (BM)-derived leukocytes and are the most potent. Nancy Luckashenak, Laurence C. Eisenlohr, in Cancer Immunotherapy (Second Edition), I Dendritic Cells: Introduction.

Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in vivo, capable of both tolerance induction and the initiation of primary T-cell responses.A number of DC subsets have been described in both men and mice with. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells derived from bone marrow precursors and form a widely distributed cellular system throughout the body.

DCs exert immune-surveillance for exogenous and endogenous antigens and the later activation of naive T lymphocytes giving rise to various immunological responses.

Different growth factors and cytokines can modulate the Cited by: 3. Human skin dendritic cells in health and disease Article Literature Review (PDF Available) in Journal of Dermatological Science 77(2) September. Overview of human dendritic cell lineages. Recent comparative phenotypic and functional studies have delineated a small number of distinct DC subsets that are widely distributed in all mammals (Table 1).In humans, all DCs express high levels of MHC class II (HLA-DR) and lack typical lineage markers CD3 (T cell), CD19/20 (B cell) and CD56 (natural killer cell).Cited by: Dermis contains a rich supply of blood and macrophages, dendritic cells, lymph vessels, and nerve endings [35].

The dermis is a connective tissue layer that gives the skin most of its substance and structure. The dermoepithelial junction contains numerous interdigitations that help anchor the dermis to the overlying epidermal layer. Haniffa, M. et al. Human tissues contain CD hi cross-presenting dendritic cells with functional homology to mouse CD + nonlymphoid dendritic cells.

Immun Cited by: Dendritic Cells, Second Edition is the new edition of the extremely successful book published in With the volume of literature on dendritic cells doubling every year, it is almost impossible to keep up.

This book provides the most up-to-date synthesis of the literature, written by. Dendritic Cells of Human Skin: Dentritic Cells in Epidermis and Their Related Cells in Dermis Cytology, Physiology and Pathology with Particular Reference to Melanin (Issues in Biomedicine, Vol.

2) [G. Niebauer, H. Stolte, R.K.H. Kinne, P. Bach] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Medical Sciences.

Klechevsky E. Human dendritic cells — stars in the skin. Eur J Immunol. ;43(12)– View this article via: PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar. Lenz A, Heine M, Schuler G, Romani N. Human and murine dermis contain dendritic cells. Isolation by means of a novel method and phenotypical and functional by:   Nestle FO, Zheng XG, Thompson CB, Turka LA, Nickoloff BJ () Characterization of dermal dendritic cells obtained from normal human skin reveals phenotypic and functionally distinctive subsets.

J Immunol – PubMed Google ScholarCited by: 6. Dendritic cells of human skin; dendritic cells in epidermis and their related cells in dermis. Cytology, physiology and pathology, with particular reference to melanin.

Langerhans cells are a subset of dendritic cells residing in the epidermis of the human skin. As such, they are key mediators of immune regulation and have emerged as.

"Dendritic Cells in Cancer," edited by Michael R. Shurin and Russell D. Salter, presents thorough analyses of the complex biology of the tumor-dendritic cell relationship, and offers insights into how cancer treatments may benefit from furthering our understanding in this : Michael R Shurin.

The third edition of this volume is aimed at providing both beginners and more experienced researchers a choice of methods to isolate and analyze dendritic cells(DC).

An introductory review provides an overview of recent advances in the characterization of DC subsets in. Dendritic cells (DCs) within the skin are a heterogeneous population of cells, including Langerhans cells of the epidermis and at least three subsets of dermal DCs.

Collectively, these DCs play important roles in the initiation of adaptive immune responses following antigen challenge of the skin as well as being mediators of tolerance to by: Uptake of HIV into dendritic cells from human skin.

Dendritic cells emigrated from whole skin explants were incubated with HIV for 2h and then fixed and embedded for transmission electron microscopy. Variable amounts of viral particles are taken up by dermal dendritic cells (left panels) and epidermal Langerhans cells (right panels).Cited by: 3.

CHAPTER 1. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF THE SKIN 3 or stratum spinosum (Murphy, ). The squamous layer is composed of a variety of cells that differ in shape, structure, and subcellular properties depending on their location. Supra - basal spinous cells, for example, are polyhedral in shape and have a rounded nucleus, whereas cells of the upper Cited by:.

Overall, this book provides a nice compilation of methods for studying dendritic cells. The book will be particularly useful for those studying murine DC, but will also provide some useful information for those initiating human DC work.

this updated book, which is unique in the field, will make a nice addition to personal and.Dendritic cells induce peripheral T cell unresponsiveness under steady state conditions in vivo. J Exp Med. ; Jonuleit H, Schmitt E, Schuler G, Knop J, Enk AH.

Induction of interleukin producing, nonproliferating CD4(+) T cells with regulatory properties by repetitive stimulation with allogeneic immature human dendritic cells. This monograph is a comprehensive review of what was current knowledge of the dendritic cells (melanocytes, nevus cells, and Langerhans cells) of the skin at the time of writing.

Its content includes the cytology (including ultrastructures), histopathology, physiology, and biochemistry of these cells with particular reference to the melanocyte Author: Funan Hu.